Blog

  • By Chung-Wha Hong | March 3, 2016
    Last night indigenous rights leader and social justice warrior Berta Cáceres was murdered in her home in Honduras. This follows weeks of mounting threats and years of violence and aggression targeting indigenous peoples, women, small farmers and environmental activists in Honduras and throughout Central America.
  • By Sara Mersha | February 25, 2016
    Sara Mersha and Chung-Wha Hong at an action during the COP21 Paris meeting.
    In a previous blog, we shared our critiques of the Paris climate agreement, and analysis of what took place. In this photo blog, we share some of the moments and lessons that demonstrate what Grassroots International celebrates from what took place in Paris – the clarity and strength of social movements on the frontlines of the climate crisis, and...
  • By Lydia Simas | February 17, 2016
    Women farmers of West Africa hold a piece of Black history and ancestral knowledge to be celebrated and honored this and every month. In Africa women produce the majority of food consumed locally, and for centuries they have been the guardians of seeds, passing on local strains from generation to generation. Grassroots International is...
  • By Sara Mersha | February 2, 2016
    The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a potentially disastrous “trade” deal, fundamentally undermines economic and social equality, environmental protection, and human rights. With Congress poised to vote on the Obama-touted deal, it’s time to expose the false promises of the TPP.The final TPP text was finally released in November after seven years...
  • By Sara Mersha | January 29, 2016
    We have been horrified by the poisoning of the water supply of the residents of Flint, Michigan, a predominantly Black community.  As part of alliances such as the Climate Justice Alliance, and through our work accompanying Global South social movements, Grassroots International understands this issue as part of the struggle against racism...
  • By Anonymous | January 20, 2016
    Water is life. Unfortunately, it is increasingly used as a weapon. And it can be a deadly one when political conflict meets drought.For decades the Israeli government has had varying degrees of legal and coercive control over the Palestinian water supply. Eighty-five percent of Palestinian water resources are controlled by Israelis and all-too-...
  • By Carol Schachet | January 5, 2016
    Palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on the planet, with some 50 million metric tons produced annually. High demand for the product is leading to the growth of African Palm plantations in Central America, which, in turn, is fueling environmental destruction, the exploitation of agricultural labor, and the displacement of local...
  • By Opal Mita | January 4, 2016
    After two years of deliberation, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights recently issued two judgements declaring the State of Honduras responsible for the violation of collective ownership rights and the lack of judicial protection in a case brought before them by a Grassroots International partner. The ruling extends protection to Garifuna (...
  • By Claire Gilbert | December 18, 2015
    Last year I had the honor of travelling to the West Bank with a delegation of 15 donors, activists and organizers all committed to winning the recognition of basic human rights in Palestine.  We spent an afternoon in the village of Al Hadidiya in the Northern Jordan Valley.  There Abu Saqer and his large family live.  Abu Saqer was...
  • By Lydia Simas | December 18, 2015
    Monsoon rains are a key part of the ecosystem in India, with whole regions depending on the seasonal monsoons for their water throughout the year. But this season’s monsoon brought a downpour of historic magnitude in the state of Tamil Nadu, destroying tens of thousands of homes and livelihoods.This is what the destructiveness of climate change...